Walking around Vic-Sur-Aisne


The Eurocamp where we stayed at for ten days was located at the La Croix du Vieux Pont at Berny-Riviera, which was conveniently located right beside the very quaint French town called Vic-Sur-Aisne in Picardy (about 100 kilometres northeast of Paris).  The husband specifically chose this site because of its location – not that far from Paris and Disneyland.  As for me, the location was perfect because I was more interested in the French countryside.

Come and have a little walk with us around this very pretty little town:


 First stop:  A little patisserie and boulangerie.  There’s little T pointing at the huge meringues by the shop window.  It was too big for her, she never finished it!  We bought very delicious and the softest croissants I’ve ever tasted in my life.  Sorry folks, I can never be a food-blogger – when it’s in front of me, taking photos is far from my mind.  Eating is more important!


The Chateau de Vic-Sur-Aisne dominates the town with its very presence.  Unluckily for us, it was a bank holiday Monday, so we couldn’t go inside to have a look.  So instead we just took some photos outside, which actually was enough.


Would’ve loved to try out this restaurant, but it always seemed shut!  One thing I’ve noticed, they don’t seem to open really long.  I’m wondering how businesses survive in France with what seems to me, very little opening hours?


 I love walking through small towns in France, everywhere you look is pretty and quaint.


Love the shutters and flower-boxes.


And there’s little T of course, doing her funny dance in the middle of the plaza.


The Town Hall.


More shutters and flowers….


Even this rusty shutters look pretty!


We kept walking until we reached the Vic-Sur-Aisne French War Cemetery.


This is another moving WWI cemetery/memorial where hundreds of French soldiers lay buried.


I didn’t notice, until my husband pointed out to me that the crosses were actually back-to-back.  Two graves, not one.


And if you look closely at all the names listed here, most of them died really young – men in their late teens, early 20s.  My husband said that just like the Somme, the place, Vic-Sur, was also a frontline in both WWI and WW2.


I find it so surprising that inspire of being ravished by both wars, somehow France still managed to preserve so many of its lovely and historical buildings.  Thank goodness for that.  Like I mentioned on this post about the war memorial in the Somme – the sad and frightening thing about all this, is that war is still happening today as I type this.  As if we have never learned our lessons from our past. Will we ever?


The walk ended in a lighter note as little T spied a playground near the woods.  Of course we had to stop and she had to play.

This post is linked-up with #CountryKids

Country Kids from Coombe Mill Family Farm Holidays CornwallAnd also:

Family Friday

 Hope everyone is having a lovely weekend!


    • Yes, alas. I can never be a food blogger. When I see food, I eat it without even thinking “Oh wait, have to take a photo first!”

    • Thanks Katie. Love France too and yes, war memorials are always sad to visit, but definitely worthwhile! x

    • I know! Food is meant to be eaten right? 😉 As for the French, same here. Came across this: “Hard-work never killed anyone, but it’s illegal in some places”http://www.despair.com/effort.html.

  1. Such a pretty town, French towns really are beautiful. I think my favourite so far is Avignon, that was gorgeous 🙂 The war memorials are terribly sad though x

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